A few days ago, before the President left for the G20 summit, I heard about a poll saying that the American people support the President’s economic actions.  I thought, sure, the legacy media is boosting him in anticipation of his European trip with a doctored poll.  How slanted was that poll?  Besides the usual oversampling of Democrats (36% vs 25% Republicans), I mean.  From Townhall, Washington Polling Games:

…Check out the way this question was asked by the Post pollsters.

“How much of the blame do you think [fill in the blank] deserves for the country’s economic situation?” The choices were corporations, banks, consumers, the Bush team and the Obama administration. There’s a built-in pro-Obama bias in there already: assigning blame to Obama for the current economy when he’s been in office for nine weeks just seems harsh to most people. But just because they (correctly) don’t blame him as the primary cause for our current woes, this doesn’t mean for a second that the public endorses his “solutions,” as the Post suggests.

But the Post questioners traveled beyond natural polling for politeness. They wanted to know why we fault these sectors. Is it the corporations “for poor management decisions”? Is it the banks, for “taking unnecessary risks”? Did consumers take on “too much debt”?

These are fair descriptions, I think we can say. But now check how they identified the problem when it was a politician: Should the public blame Bush for “inadequate regulation of the financial industry”? Or is Obama to blame for “not doing enough to turn the economy around”?

…The Post drew the numbers they wanted: While every other politician and group was blamed “a great deal or a good amount” for the downturn by at least 70 percent in the poll, Obama was only blamed to that extent by 26 percent.

And so they can say that America is behind the President.

A result they forgot to mention:

Then there were poll questions that the Post editors didn’t want on the front page — or even anywhere in the poll story by political reporter Dan Balz and pollster Jon Cohen. On the front page, Post readers saw the big news — a bar graph showing that 60 percent approve of how Obama is handling the economy. But if you look at the Internet and read the actual poll, there’s another number the Post deliberately left out. Pollsters asked, “Do you approve or disapprove of the federal government’s overall response to the economic situation?” Forty-nine percent said they supported the overall federal government response.

So who, boys and girls, is the “federal government? It’s controlled by a Democratic president, and a strongly Democratic Congress. One could clearly state, then, that less than half of the public supports President Obama’s economic agenda. But the Post ignored this so as to trumpet the opposite.

See the poll here.

Sounds more like image management than an honest assessment of peoples’ attitudes. Millions will read about this biased poll online.  How many pixels have been sacrificed in this exercise in public relations?  Save the pixel!  Ignore polls with an agenda.

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