The Obama Administrations’s stated reason for participating in the UN Human Rights Council’s Durban II planning was to influence the outcome through engagement.  Judge for yourself the means used and the results obtained in pursuit of that good intention.  The Obama Administration Sacrifices Israel
The cover-up on Durban II’s anti-Semitic agenda.

The Obama administration’s decision to join the planning of the U.N.’s Durban II “anti-racism” conference has just taken a new twist: cover-up. On Friday, State Department officials and a member of the American Durban II delegation claimed the United States had worked actively to oppose efforts to brand Israel as racist in the committee drafting a Durban II declaration. The trouble is that they didn’t.

The Feb. 20 State Department press release says the U.S. delegation in Geneva “outline[d] our concerns with the current outcome document” and in particular “our strong reservations about the direction of the conference, as the draft document singles out Israel for criticism.” One member of the delegation told The Washington Post: “The administration is pushing back against efforts to brand Israel as racist in this conference.” In fact, tucked away in a Geneva hall with few observers, the U.S. had done just the opposite. The U.S. delegates had made no objection to a new proposal to nail Israel in an anti-racism manifesto that makes no other country-specific claims.

The purpose of Durban II:

European Union delegates confirmed that their silence on the Palestinian proposal was deliberate, commenting off-camera that the references to Israeli racism had already been made in the Durban I Declaration, and the purpose of Durban II is to implement Durban I.

Influencing or legitimizing?

Evidently, a U.S. team bent on legitimizing Durban II believed it would be counter-productive to object vigorously to sections most likely to be noticed by Americans skeptical about participation in the conference. They must have figured that no objection would mean no controversy, which in turn would mean there would be no cause for complaint from U.S. observers. That’s one way to buy favors on the international stage, but it sure doesn’t forward a stated intention of changing the Conference direction. Nor does it promote the ultimate need to change the anti-Semitic and anti-democratic direction of global human rights policy.

…The strategy is painfully obvious–spin out the time for considering whether or not to attend the April 20 conference until the train has left the station and jumping off would cause greater injury to multilateral relations than just taking a seat.

The delay tactics are indefensible. The U.S. administration attended four full days of negotiation. During that time they witnessed the following: the failure to adopt a proposal to act against Holocaust denial, a new proposal to single out Israel, which will now be included in the draft without brackets, broad objections to anything having to do with sexual orientation, vigorous refusal by many states to back down on references to “Islamophobia” (the general allegation of a racist Western plot to discriminate against all Muslims), and numerous attacks on free speech.

This “dialogue” is not promoting rights and freedoms. It is legitimizing a forum for disputing the essence of democracy, handing Holocaust deniers a global platform and manufacturing the means to demonize Israel in the interests of those states bent on the Jewish state’s destruction.

Previous posts on the Obama Administration and Durban II:

Influence Peddling
Obama and Durban II
World Approval At Any Price
Negotiating Freedom
The Continuing Degradation Of Human Rights
Human Rights Fraud

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